• VPMA comments on 2016 Budget, VPMA
  • VPMA comments on 2016 Budget, VPMA
  • VPMA comments on 2016 Budget, VPMA
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  • Petplan Veterinary Awards Practice Manager of the Year Winner 2017 - Anne Corson

    Petplan Practice Manager of the Year Winner, Anne Corson from Pennard Vets in Tonbridge, Kent demonstrates the type of work she carries out in a normal working day. Watch the Video.

     
  • APPRAISALS: A SIMPLE GUIDE



    Renay Rickard, VPMA president, armed new managers with a suite of tools to help conduct appraisals with a range of practice team members during her ‘New to Management’ webinar


    Conducting appraisals causes many new managers to pale at the thought, but VPMA’s president, Renay Rickard, put minds at rest with a straightforward guide to the ‘Do’s and Don’ts’ of staff appraisals, during VPMA’s second New to Management webinar held on March 15.

    The message was clear from the beginning: make appraisals in your practice a positive experience and something that members of the team actually look forward to instead of dread!

    “In the early days, when I first started to do appraisals in my practice, it was viewed as an annual telling off! We want it to be a positive experience all round. We now have people coming to me and asking when their next appraisal is – that’s when you know you’re doing something right,” said Renay.

    It’s important to make your team member feel at ease and special – this is time invested in them in a busy practice where time is pressured and not everyone always gets listened to, continued Renay. “It’s important to commit to a time you’ve set – I’ll allow a time to be cancelled once but the appraisal has to go ahead the next time. It’s a big deal for the person being appraised so make sure they feel important and that your meeting is held somewhere private and uninterrupted,” she added.

    Being clear about the purpose of the appraisal and giving the reasons why you’re holding one is important for clarity and consistency among staff. Key to this, said Renay, was having a structure and procedure in place, including making your key performance criteria available to everyone – publishing them in the staff handbook in Renay’s practice.  

    Stats

    Polls carried out during the webinar showed an interesting split between delegates in their concerns over conducting appraisals. When asked “What is your biggest challenge regarding appraisals?” the responses were as follows:

    33%  “Unsure how to keep emotion out of it”

    27%  “Worried about confrontation issues”

    22%  “Not having a formal process in place”

    16%  “Don’t have enough objective info”

    2%   “The team members are senior to me or at practice longer”


    When asked whether their practice had an appraisal process in place, the results showed almost one-third did not.


    62% Had a process in place

    31% Did not have a process in place

    8 % Were not sure


    The message from Renay for practices without an established appraisals process was to not be intimidated by the prospect and start one yourself. She said: “If your practice doesn’t have a review process, do start one in an informal way and do it yourself if you’re heading up a small team. Ensure that the person who does take on this task has the authority to make changes or raise issues with the bosses – there’s nothing more frustrating for staff than being promised a chat and airing their views only for it not to go any further.”


    Renay shared her protocol for appraisals, which will be distributed on the accompanying slides to webinar delegates. You may still sign up now to this and other webinars in the series; visit
    http://events-by-vpma.co.uk/


    The next webinar in the series is entitled
    Difficult Team Members and Disciplinary Processes and will be delivered by Simone Taylor from Citation on April 12 at 8pm. This webinar will look at how to handle difficult team scenarios and what might be expected of you in managing a disciplinary process.


    To sign up or for more information email
    secretariat@vpma.co.uk or visit http://events-by-vpma.co.uk/

     
  • RCVS Strategic Plan 2017/19

    Leadership, innovation and culture change focus for three-year strategic plan

    The Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (RCVS) has published its Strategic Plan for 2017 to 2019, with a focus on developing leadership within the veterinary professions, encouraging innovation, and further extending a learning culture as a counter to the ‘blame’ culture that exists in some parts of the profession.


    The Strategic Plan was developed throughout the course of 2016 with input from a number of stakeholders including RCVS Council and Veterinary Nurses Council, key committees and College staff. Most importantly, the evidence for change came from the wide and deep consultations that took place within Vet Futures, the joint RCVS and British Veterinary Association project that aims to help the veterinary profession prepare for and shape its future.

    This process led to the development of five key ambitions for the next three years:

    • Learning culture: to establish the extent to which a ‘blame’ culture exists in the veterinary professions, the role that the RCVS may play in it, the impact it may have on the welfare of vets, veterinary nurses, owners and their animals, and how we can move towards a culture that has a greater focus on learning and personal development.

    • Leadership and innovation: to become a Royal College with leadership and innovation at its heart, and support this creatively and with determination.

    • Continuing to be a First-rate Regulator: continuing to build on the foundations that have already been laid, we will work to ensure that the legislation and regulations that support us are not only fit for purpose today, but enable us to make the UK veterinary professions, and those allied professionals who work alongside them, the best that they can be into the future.

    • Global reach: in part a response to Brexit and the need to be more externally-facing but with an emphasis to improve animal health and welfare on an international basis by raising veterinary standards overseas, contributing to the One Health agenda and ensuring that our regulation keeps pace in a global market.

    • Our service agenda: to continue to build on our service agenda to ensure that people not only find interactions with us to be efficient and fair, but seek out and take up opportunities to engage further.

    Nick Stace, RCVS CEO, said: “The hallmark of our 2014 to 2016 Strategic Plan was getting the basics right by clarifying our identity, improving our core functions, setting out our service agenda and strengthening our foundations. The plan gave us a firm foundation to build upon and improved levels of confidence in the College from stakeholders which has allowed us to be more ambitious and outward-looking with this new plan.

    “Within the new plan there are challenging ambitions and stretching objectives that address some of the big issues affecting the veterinary team, whether that’s playing a more global role post-Brexit, the importance of embracing new technology, or the pressing need to consider culture change within the profession to ensure it continues to grow and learn.

    “I would ask each member of the profession to take a look at the Strategic Plan and I am very happy to receive comments and feedback on the plan by email at nick@rcvs.org.uk.”

    To download the Strategic Plan please visit www.rcvs.org.uk/publications

     
  • VPMA / SPVS Congress 2017

    Join us at the Celtic Manor Resort, Newport from the 26th to 28th January 2017.

    From behaviour economics to the ultimate front of house experience; resilience to understanding mindsets; practical H&S to managing social media, with speakers from home and abroad; within and outside the profession - you don't want to miss this event.

    Incorporating the New to Management Stream: whether you're a head nurse, a lead vet in a clinical role, an administrator or client care team leader, you probably have some management elements to your job; or are you moving into management but finding it a bit daunting?  This stream is pitched at introductory level.

    For full details about Congress, click here.

     

Veterinary Business Video Show - Latest Episode

You can click here to view any or all of the previous episodes of the Veterinary Business Video Show

VPMA comments on 2016 Budget

17th March 2016

 

BUDGET 2016: WHAT’S THE IMPACT ON LIFE IN
VETERINARY PRACTICE?

       Chancellor “giveth and then taketh away…”

VPMA, the professional association for veterinary practice managers and anyone with an interest in veterinary business, has issued a statement on the 2016 Budget and how it may affect veterinary practices and pet owners.

Budget summary:

BUDGET 2016: "DOING THE RIGHT THING FOR THE NEXT GENERATION"

George Osborne's eighth Budget speech came at a time of growing economic uncertainty.

The Office for Budget Responsibility has revised down its growth forecast for 2016 from 2.4 per cent to 2.2 per cent and the Chancellor warned that the global economic outlook is weak.

Despite these challenges the government is committed to achieving a budget surplus in 2019/20.

Against this backdrop, the Chancellor promised a budget that "puts the next generation first".

 

VPMA’s view:

How does the 2016 Budget stack up for veterinary practices operating in the current generation? Weak global growth forecasts are always a bit gloomy; however, historically the UK veterinary industry has withstood fluctuations in the global economies in a robust manner, and the plannedpersonal allowance increase from £11,000 in 2016/17 to £11,500 in 2017/18 presents an opportunity as people find a little extra change in their pockets to fund “affordable treats” for themselves and their pets.

Slightly less sunny for pet owners and practices alike is the increase in insurance premium tax (IPT) from 9.5% to 10%. Although seemingly a small percentage increase, in actuality this will noticeably increase the cost of all insurance policies, and reduce clients’ disposable income. It will add significantly to practice premises and professional indemnity insurance policies, and the increase in pet policy premiums may put insurance cover out of reach for a larger share of our pet-owning market – with implications for both practice profitability and animal welfare.

In business terms, a few bones have been thrown our way in terms of corporation tax reduction with an additional 2% reduction for April 2020 (17%) being added to the already planned reduction to 19% from 20% on 1 April 2017, and several adjustments to the small business rate relief in England from April 2017, offering benefits to those with rateable values below £51,000. Particularly benefitting are those with rateable values less than £15,000. However, beware the Director who rubs his or her hands at the prospect of less Corporation Tax as the significant imminent increases in dividend taxation may see the Chancellor “giveth and then taketh away…”